Author Archives: Mike Marchev

There are 773 articles by Mike Marchev published on this site.


Tip #20: Adopt The Rule of 7

This is Tip #20 from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

Everything you do has something in common with personal discipline, and is influenced in some way by professional selling skills. We are all selling something to someone, which makes us all professional salespeople.

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This is Tip #19 from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

When I ask young people to “read,” I feel like I’m asking them to sit down and prepare themselves for a root canal. Who or what is to blame? TV? Video Games? Computer Screens? Smart Phones? Poor Eyesight? Who cares?

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Tip #18: Start Saving Today

This is Tip #18 from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

I hope that this lesson does not fall on deaf ears. I have not met any person over the age of 50 who has not voiced regret for not saving for their future sooner than they did. (Who knew at the time they would live this long?)

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Tip #17: Focus

This is Tip #17 from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

Not long ago, the term multitasking came into vogue, and everybody started to wear it like a badge of courage. What you did not read about was the associated stress that accompanies multitasking, along with the multitude of major-league screw-ups resulting from such a counter- productive practice. The jury is back, and the proof has been documented. Multitasking does not work. Most people believe they are smart enough to pull it off. News Flash. You are not.

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Tip #16: Make Somebody’s Day

This is Tip #16 from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

Show Appreciation Regularly. My good friend Stuart Cohen refers to this as the “attitude of gratitude.” Another way of looking at this is “knowing what side of the bread the butter goes on.” Showing thanks is of great importance and significance. And although everybody knows they should do it, this practice is seldom exercised.

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Tip #15: Seek a Balanced Life

This is Tip #15 from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

The concept of balance is often overlooked when it comes to building a life worth talking about. Most people skip right over the topic thinking it is too obvious, too elementary, too mundane.

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Tip #14: Be First. Speed Wins

This is Tip #14 from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

“Speed Wins” is a good motto for you, and it should not take too long to commit to memory. Before I give you my thoughts on “speed,” I would like to acknowledge this motto’s counterpoint, which reminds us in no uncertain terms “Haste makes waste.” I’ll accept your point of view and come right back with my response being “He who hesitates is lost.” Your move!

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Tip #13: Be On Time

This is Tip #13 from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

Being on time for appointments, meetings, and scheduled events is a sign of respect. You will be silently judged accordingly. Being late is a selfish act.

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This is Tip #12 from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

All people have “bad hair days.” Although most of us are good at heart, we all can show our weak side now and then. Try not to judge people during their “momentary” lapse in behavior. Give people the benefit of the doubt whenever possible.

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This tip is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

First impressions are important. Within milliseconds of my laying eyes on you, I will make an opinion on whether you are my kind of person or not. This is the way human nature works. Right or wrong, that is the way things are.

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This tip is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

You will soon learn that not everybody is a trusting, honest, and well-meaning soul. In fact, there are a number of people who feel it is their role in life to take advantage of others. They are good at fooling you. They actually enjoy being deceitful. Be cautious of who you trust. Don’t let your guard down too quickly.

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Tip #9: Ask For Help

This tip is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

It is not a sign of weakness to ask for help when needed. In fact, it is a true sign of a mature individual who knows and appreciates the contributions of others. I urge you to ask for help when needed, before it is too late.

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This tip is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

Through no fault of your own, you (we) are living in an “I want it and I want it now” world. Enter the credit card.

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This tip is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

You already know everything you already know. The secret is to find out what other people know (and think and believe) and then take what “fits” and internalize it for your own benefit. That can only be accomplished by asking more questions and listening to the answers. This lesson will significantly affect your worth in the next 50 years. Please be one of the few who see the wisdom behind my words.

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This tip a is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

In Tip #5, I left you with the thought that in order for people to feel glad that they know you, you must appear to be interested in them, their lives, their stories, their experiences, and their opinions.

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This tip is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

This is a major-league point, but also may prove to be a difficult pill to swallow: It is never about you. It will never be about you. It is, and always will be, about “them.”

Up until now, it may have seemed that it has been about you, but those days are over. From now on it is important for you to make every effort to enter the world of the person you are speaking to or writing to.

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This tip is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

It makes little difference to me whether you have elected to study for another four years or you have decided to enter the labor market right out of the gates. What I do care about is that regardless of the path you decide to take, I want you to be damn good at what you are doing. Honest, hard working, and damn good.

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Tip #3: Be Coachable

This tip is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

I know you are good. I know you are smart. I know you have accomplished a lot. But I also know you can get better. I know you have a lot more to learn. I know you must get better.

Being receptive to constructive “coaching” is a sign of an intelligent person regardless of their age and/or experience. It is important to understand the difference between “criticism” and “coaching.” They are not the same. Criticism has no apparent benefit. It is a verbal attempt at headlining one’s shortcomings, usually for the enjoyment of the person doing the criticizing.

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Tip #2: Don’t Quit

This tip is from my Special Report written for recent high school graduates. It is also relevant to most adults. (Make that all adults.)

The facts in this article are 100% true and yes, I did get into Notre Dame. Read on with a low class rank and an even lower SAT Score.

Many Americans seem to have been stricken with the disease “quit-itis.” I think it may have something to do with expecting “instant gratification.” We have become impatient as a rule and we want and expect things now.

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Tip #1: Fail Faster

This is the first of 21 tips in Mike’s latest book designed for high school graduates. It so happens that every adult can benefit from the same reminders.

Tip #1: Fail Faster. (Accelerate your failure rate)

How’s that for kicking off this booklet on a positive note? “This guy is actually suggesting that I fail faster.” There are a couple of facts in life that you will soon be experiencing, some more pleasurable than others. I can guarantee you that sooner or later you will be experiencing failure in some way, shape, or form. The worst thing you can do is try to avoid this aspect of your life. If success is something you want to achieve in the coming years, failure will become a key ingredient.

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Yes, This Could Happen To You

A large advertising agency lost the Mars candy account after 70 years of service and $70 million dollars in annual billings. The well-known D’Arcy Advertising Agency had been respected for over 70 years, and was caught by surprise when told of the Mars’ decision to switch agencies.

I am certain there were people walking the halls thinking that this account was in the bag…after 70 years? I can hear people sharing their opinions at the water cooler. “This account is all ours. We own this account. It is in the bag for at least another ten years.”

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