Posts Tagged With: points of contact

There are 16 articles tagged with “points of contact” published on this site.


Dressed for success: sales collateral

Whether you are an agent in a storefront agency with a large group of travel professionals and business development specialists, or whether you are a sole proprietor, you have a team to assemble. You require a full family of sales collateral that carries a consistent look and message. Your logo, your company name, your business cards, your company brochure, your email address, web site, Powerpoint presentations, invoices, print and email advertising, sales letters and stationery are all team members that carry your company’s mission out into the world.

Just as we daily groom ourselves in a mirror, perhaps we should spend some time making sure our sales collateral is properly suited up to do its job. Each piece of collateral is a “point of contact” with the public and will shape how the public perceives the professionalism of your travel practice. Read the rest of this entry »

Loosely defined, our points of contact are those points at which a client can form an impression of our travel practice. Points of contact range from our logo and business cards, to our presentation formats, our manner of dress and even the places where we meet with clients. The sum total of our points of contact add up to form our image. The more professional our image, the more confidence clients have when it comes time to turn thousands of hard earned dollars over to us for their vacation. Needless to say, therefore, our points of contact must be kept in top condition. The reality, however, is we often create our points of contact independently of our mission statement and any guiding touch point and each becomes a separate marketing tool unrelated to the others or neglected after months of use.

Evaluation of your points of contact  forces us to take a hard, honest look at ourselves. To project a professional image, you must use professional tools. Too many agents use logos that look like clip art and free consumer email addresses. No doubt it is cheaper to do it yourself than to hire a professional, but a “do-it-yourself” message is not one that agents want to impart Read the rest of this entry »

Sizing Up Your Competition

Here’s the bad news: you have more competition than you think.  Here’s the good news – you  can effectively compete. In fact, competition keeps us sharp and aware of the environment in which we operate.  Keep in mind that carrying the proper attitude about your competition is important.  Properly trained, your clients will adopt many aspects of your own attitude about travel and other distribution channels.  If your attitude is positive and healthy, chance are your clients’ will be as well.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Presentations You Make

The manner in which you present your research efforts to clients can make all of the difference in their reactions in your recommendations. Too often, all of the effort that we have placed into our marketing, sales and research swirls around the drain and then disappears because of a weak presentation. Yet, this is the moment at which a travel consultant should be at their best, making a recommendation based on their experience and expertise. It is very true that it is not what we say but how we say it that matters. This is not a sales person’s trick, but a bona fide principle of communication. If you want to be an effective advocate for either your travel client or for travel product, give some consideration about how you present your recommendations to clients. Read the rest of this entry »

The Tools With Which You Work

Whether you are an agent in a storefront agency with a large group of travel agents and business development specialists, or whether you are a sole proprietor, you have a team to assemble. You require a full family of sales collateral that carries a consistent look and message. Your logo, your company name, your business cards, your company brochure, your email address, web site, Powerpoint presentations, invoices, print and email advertising, sales letters and stationery are all team members that carry your company’s mission out into the world. Spend some time making sure they are properly suited up to do their job. Read the rest of this entry »

Your Points of Contact

Most travel agencies pay a great deal of attention to the brand image they project in their advertising. An advertisement printed in a magazine or newspaper gets a rare amount of attention from everyone involved. The agency owner, the marketing department, the ad designer, all get involved looking closely at the details to ensure that it projects the appropriate image for the agency. After all, the advertisement will be seen by hundreds, even thousands of potential travel agency clients. Read the rest of this entry »

Professional Appearances – E-mail Etiquette

While it may be true that you only have one opportunity to make a first impression, you have countless opportunities to communicate your brand to existing and potential clients. This week, TRO’s 365 Guide will look at five different points of contact with clients where appearances matter. We will begin with email communications.

It is easy to let the informality of an email control its appearance. Most of us, however, have experienced getting an email from a company or an individual that was nearly incomprehensible, poorly articulated with misspellings and grammatical errors. Let’s look at a few rules that will save you from an embarrassing email experience of your own. Read the rest of this entry »

We are devoting this week to the concept of branding your travel agency. A brand is a short cut – when your brand is strong, clients and potential clients that have been exposed to your brand will think of you when they think of travel. Your brand will carry your company’s message and, as a result, your company will have a distinct market advantage. But these good results can only happen if you are communicating your brand to the market clearly and in a consistent manner. Further, your brand must appear with sufficent frequency to gain consumer mindshare. A quick examination of each of these elements can help you to better understand the importance of communicating your brand. Read the rest of this entry »

A Week of Important Observations: 3 & 4

This week we are looking at 10 fundamental marketing principles that will provide a basis for consistent and successful marketing efforts. Today’s two principles are perhaps the most important of those we will list. Taken together, our third and fourth principle place an edge on all of your marketing and will guide your every marketing decision.  Read the rest of this entry »

The Travel Agents With Whom You Work

As I sometimes do, I stopped in to visit with a travel agency the other day. I always look forward to the opportunity. I learn something every time. This time, however, what I saw was a good example of a bad example. There was one agent on the phone, and she barely acknowledged my arrival with “Someone will be with you in a moment.” As I took my seat she continued her telephone conversation which centered on the price of an airline ticket. Her grammar was sub-standard, and her sales technique nonexistent. After I sat there for another few minutes, she finally yelled into the back of the office that “there was a customer out front.” The agent who emerged to greet me was friendly enough, but had very little presence or personality. I’m fairly certain she did not have a smile. No, the owner was not in, but by that time it no longer mattered. My expectations of that office in general were now pretty low. I did not expect the world’s greatest travel agent was lurking in one of the other offices in the back. Read the rest of this entry »

Examine Your Points of Contact

Most travel agencies pay a great deal of attention to the brand image they project in their advertising. An advertisement printed in a magazine or newspaper gets a rare amount of attention from everyone involved. The agency owner, the marketing department, the ad designer, all get involved looking closely at the details to ensure that it projects the appropriate image for the agency. After all, the advertisement will be seen by hundreds, even thousands of potential travel agency clients. Read the rest of this entry »

Dress Up Your Emails!

There are few travel consultants who do not make heavy use of email to stay in touch with their clients. Marketing collateral is delivered by email.  Presentations, itineraries and thank you notes all are commonly emailed correspondence moving between agent and client. If one of our objectives  is to enhance the professionalism of our travel practice, we will want to pay attention to such an important tool as email.  Let’s look at a few aspects of your email correspondence.

It is easy to dash off an email. Unfortunately, the very ease with which email can be composed and sent also can tend to make us too casual Read the rest of this entry »

Points of Contact: Business Letters for Travel Agents

Yesterday, we opened a discussion about points of contact – places where clients encounter your branding. One of the most neglected points of contact is the business letter. So many travel agents now use email that the art of writing a business letter is nearly forgotten. Yet, there are times when a business letter is a far better communication alternative. Poorly written, however, the business letter can give your clients or potential clients the wrong impression of your agency. Here are a few tips for getting it right and conveying the brand image you hope to inject into every one of your brand points of contact. Read the rest of this entry »

Your 2009 Marketing Plan: Points of Contact

TRO is devoting the next few weeks to assisting agents in developing a 2009 Marketing Plan. Follow along with us each day to gain the traction you need to make 2009 your best year ever.

Now that we know which Distribution Channels we will use in our 2009 Marketing Plan, we need to develop the tactics necessary to approach each channel successfully. Before we do, however, we have one more important step to consider – our Points of Contact. Loosely defined, our Points of Contact are those points at which a client can form an impression of our travel practice. Points of Contact range from our logo and business cards, to our Read the rest of this entry »

Your 2009 Marketing Plan: Understanding Your Objectives

TRO is devoting the next few weeks to assisting agents in developing a 2009 Marketing Plan. Follow along with us each day to gain the traction you need to make 2009 your best year ever.

Yesterday, we established a set of strategic objectives for 2009. Today, we want to develop a better understanding of our goals. Two of the objectives we established, gaining a net 15 total clients and growing net profit 20% work hand-in-hand. If I increase the number of clients I work with, certainly my profits should increase. Likewise, creating a niche market Read the rest of this entry »

Examine Your Points of Contact

If you want a good idea of how others see your image as a travel consultant, look at all of your “points of contact” – those places where the client comes into contact with your image. Look at your business cards, your logo and letter head. Does your email address indicate a professional or a consumer? Is the artwork professionally Read the rest of this entry »