Present Like a Pro | TravelResearchOnline

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Present Like a Pro

As much as I enjoy speaking to groups of people and sharing my ideas and experiences, I understand how difficult this may be for others. I have no intention of minimizing this very real fear.

It would be easy for me to suggest that, if speaking is in fact public a genuine fear of yours, it is time that you get over it. As much as I would like to say that, I will not.

If you are interested in growing your business, there are a number of topics needing to be addressed. You will be meeting new people. You will have a service to offer them. They will not have a reason to accept or reject your offer until they understand exactly what your offer is. If you do not clearly explain your offer, who will? Therefore, it is high time you come to respect and appreciate the importance of a well-orchestrated presentation.

The presentation is nothing more than another example of speaking in public. Whether you have 6 or 600 people, listening is immaterial. The information you will be sharing remains the same.

I think where fear enters the picture is when you start thinking that somebody in the audience is poised and prepared to challenge your material. To this end, I would like to mention two things: First, people have better things to do then attend your presentation with the intention of poking holes in it. Secondly, if you stick to the truth as you know it, you shouldn’t care what other people think.

You are sharing your beliefs and experiences in an effort to help other people make better travel related decisions. Nothing should come easier then telling people what you know to be the facts.

If they choose to believe, it (or not) has nothing to do with you. That is their prerogative and, in many cases, their problem.

I mentioned in an earlier message this year that there are only two kinds of people in the world. Those you can help and the other kind. When you bump into the other kind, you simply have to let them follow their own path. There’s nothing you can say or do to change their mind. Your mission is to find the people who have an interest in your subject matter and want to listen and benefit from your suggestions, recommendations, and experiences.

In an effort to simplify the task, the next time you find yourself preparing for a presentation, I want you to think of three items or suggestions that you feel make sense. Just three. After you have completed addressing all three points, you invite questions from the audience.

 

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Here’s a little trick that will ensure smooth sailing. Before your presentation begins, “grease” the audience with three questions that you have prepared beforehand. Approach a few audience members prior to the Q&A session. If there is more than five seconds of silence, ask them to ask you your written question. You hand them the slip of paper with a question on it. Since you wrote the question, you obviously know the answer. It is been my experience that I have never had to go to my third greased question. After the first question or two, the audience will get the idea of how this Q&A thing works and they will take over from that point on. You will soon be having more fun that you’ve ever had in the travel business answering questions from the audience.

Don’t make this presentation thing harder than it has to be. Three points plus three greased questions equals the time of your life.

 


Mike Marchev

Mike Marchev is always looking for a few more proactive travel professionals to join his Sales and Marketing Club. Send for details.

 

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